October 17, 2021

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Science & Technology
Sense of smell is our most rapid warning system

Did Venus ever have oceans?

The planet Venus can be seen as the Earth’s evil twin. At first sight, it is of comparable mass and size as our home planet, similarly consists mostly of rocky material, holds some water and has an atmosphere. Yet, a closer look reveals striking differences between them: Venus’ thick CO2 atm...
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Sense of smell is our most rapid warning system

Strange radio waves emerge from the direction of the galactic center: A variable signal aligned to the heart of the Milky Way is tantalising scientists

Astronomers have discovered unusual signals coming from the direction of the Milky Way’s centre. The radio waves fit no currently understood pattern of variable radio source and could suggest a new class of stellar object. “The strangest property of this new signal is that it is has a very h...
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Sense of smell is our most rapid warning system

Chang’e-5 samples reveal key age of moon rocks: Scientists share analysis of first fresh samples from the moon in more than 40 years

A lunar probe launched by the Chinese space agency recently brought back the first fresh samples of rock and debris from the moon in more than 40 years. Now an international team of scientists — including an expert from Washington University in St. Louis — has determined the age of these moo...
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Sense of smell is our most rapid warning system

Neuroscientists roll out first comprehensive atlas of brain cells: BRAIN initiative consortium takes census of motor cortex cells in mice, marmoset and humans

When you clicked to read this story, a band of cells across the top of your brain sent signals down your spine and out to your hand to tell the muscles in your index finger to press down with just the right amount of pressure to activate your mouse or track pad. A slew of ...
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Sense of smell is our most rapid warning system

How a racing heart may alter decision-making brain circuits: Body-state monitoring neurons can hijack the decision-making process

Anxiety, addiction, and other psychiatric disorders are often characterized by intense states of what scientists call arousal: The heart races, blood pressure readings rise, breaths shorten, and “bad” decisions are made. In an effort to understand how these states influence the brain’s...
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